Research into cord blood therapy uncovered medical benefits of using cord blood stem cells to help improve the lives of patients with leukaemia, lymphoma, and other blood disorders. Ongoing clinical trials are testing whether cord blood stem cells can be used as a viable therapeutic option for other diseases.

A new trial is underway at Duke University with support from a US cord blood bank to determine if cord blood stem cells can help children living with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Duke is currently conducting a cord blood trial to help children with cerebral palsy, and the new autism trial is the next step in determining new benefits of cord blood therapy.

The trial will involve 20 children between the ages of 2 and 5 years old who are currently living with ASD. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 1.5 percent of US children are living with ASD. If cord blood stem cells can provide therapy for ASD, more children will live healthier lives.

Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg, who is leading the cord blood trial regarding cerebral palsy, will also take the lead on the autism trial. Dr. Kurtzberg says both trials are part of an overarching mission for researchers to identify new potential uses for cord blood stem cell therapy.

“We hope to learn whether cord blood infusions are safe and to define the best tests to use to study the effects of cord blood in future studies.”

More details about the ASD cord blood trial are available by following the link here.

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Can Cord Blood Help Children With ASD?