A clinical trial has just been announced that will investigate autologous stem cell therapy in children diagnosed as having prenatal or perinatal paediatric stroke.

This trial will be conducted in 2 phases beginning with the examination of the use of newborn autologous stem cell therapy and then an assessment of the safety and efficacy of the use of these stem cells to improve common symptoms of prenatal or perinatal paediatric stroke.

The American Stroke Association identifies stroke as one of the leading causes of death in children between 1 and 19 years of age. In approximately 60% of children surviving, permanent neurological deficits result.

Long-term disabilities resulting from stroke include; cerebral palsy, hemiparesis or hemiplegia total or partial paralysis of one side of the body, epileptic seizures, spasticity and bladder control issues.

Dr. James Baumgartner, paediatric neurosurgeon and principal investigator of the trial notes, “There is a critical need for the development of new treatments as the incidence and prevalence of paediatric stroke have increased over time”.

The trial will include 10 children between the ages of 6 weeks and 6 years who have suffered from a stroke in utero or immediately after birth. The trial participants must also have a CBR-processed cord blood unit that was collected at birth.

Initially, participants will be given a baseline neurological evaluation, including brain imagine, evaluation of epilepsy, nerve impulses and bladder control issues. This will help to assess the overall severity of the stroke’s impact prior to the trial treatment.

The hope is that the use of the autologous stem cells will help repair the damage that occurred during the stroke.

For further details regarding eligibility criteria for the trial, visit: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02460484

Source: follow the link.

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Clinical Trial To Assess Use Of Newborn Stem Cells In Treatment Of Pediatric Stroke