Public Donation — Insception Lifebank

Cord Blood Basics

Cord Blood Basics

Public Donation

Family or public cord blood banking?

Choosing to bank your baby’s cord blood means that you recognize the lifesaving potential of cord blood and you are taking a proactive step to preserve it rather than discard it as medical waste. But should you enroll in a family cord blood bank or donate to a public cord blood bank?

Here’s how your options differ:

 Family cord blood banking with Insception LifebankPublic cord blood banking with Canadian Blood Services (CBS)
Availability 
  • Service available at all Canadian hospitals and home deliveries
  • Takes donations in:
    Ottawa — at the Ottawa Hospital General and Civic campuses
    Brampton— at the William Osler Health System’s Brampton Civic Hospital
    Edmonton — at the Alberta Health Services’ Lois Hole Hospital for Women
    Vancouver — at the BC Women’s Hospital and Health Centre
Enrollment
  • Possible up to less than a week before due date (4-6 weeks before is recommended)
  • Required 6 weeks before due date
Eligibility
  • All donor types, except those who are HIV, HTLV, hep B and/or C positive
  • ~98% of units are banked 
  • Based on mother’s health and age at delivery22
  • In US public banks, ~30- 50% of donated units are banked; the remaining samples do not meet eligibility and acceptance criteria and are not actually banked1
Cost
  • Enrollment fee applies, with  $1,050 for collection and processing, and $125 for annual storage fees
  • No cost to the healthcare system for release of cord blood unit
  • No cost to the donor
Access to stored unit

Cord blood unit:

  • Is owned by family
  • Can only be accessed by family
  • Can only be released with family’s written consent
  • Will be available to family if needed in future

Cord blood unit:

  • Is owned by CBS
  • Placed on an international registry and made accessible to transplant centres worldwide
  • May not be available to donating family if needed in future
Sample release
  • A sample can be released from Insception Lifebank within one week if needed
  • Wait times vary depending on availability of a match
  • A matched cord blood unit can be released in ~2 weeks
How sample is used
  • Transplant or regenerative medicine therapy for the child from which the cord blood was collected
  • Transplant for a family member if match is acceptable
  • Unrelated transplant
  • Unrelated treatment for regenerative medicine
Matching
  • Perfect match for child from which the cord blood was collected
  • 25% chance of a perfect match to a sibling28
  • National Marrow Donor Program requires a match of at least 4 of 6 human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) for a cord blood unit to be used for transplant1
Transplant survival rates
  • A recent study showed improved survival rates and reduced graft versus host disease when using related compared to unrelated cord blood stem cells5
  • A recent study showed lower survival rates and significantly increased complications when using unrelated compared to related cord blood stem cells5